D-IO (Chacon)ΒΆ

Feature Support
Sending no
Receiving yes
Config yes

Supported Brands

Brand Protocol
KlikAanKlikUit kaku_screen
DI-O (Chacon) dio_screen

Sender Arguments

-t --up           send an up signal
-f --down         send an down signal
-u --unit=unit    control a device with this unit code
-i --id=id        control a device with this id
-a --all          send command to all devices with this id
-l --learn        send multiple streams so screen can learn

Config

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{
  "devices": {
    "screen": {
      "protocol": [ "kaku_screen" ],
      "id": [{
        "id": 100,
        "unit": 0
      }],
      "state": "down"
     }
  },
  "gui": {
    "screen": {
      "name": "Screen",
      "group": [ "Living" ],
      "media": [ "all" ]
    }
  }
}
Option Value
id 0 - 67108863
unit 0 - 15
state on / off

Optional Settings

GUI Settings

Setting Default Format Description
readonly 0 1 or 0 Disable controlling this device from the GUIs
confirm 0 1 or 0 Ask for confirmation when switching device

Notes

If you want your switch to learn new codes, you can use the following command:

pilight-send -p kaku_screen -i 1 -u 1 -t -l

If you want your switch to remove a learned code, you can use the following command:

pilight-send -p kaku_screen -i 1 -u 1 -f -l

Protocol

This protocol sends 132 pulses like this

286 2825 286 201 289 1337 287 209 283 1351 287 204 289 1339 288 207 288 1341 289 207 281 1343 284 205 292 1346 282 212 283 1348 282 213 279 1352 282 211 281 1349 282 210 283 1347 284 211 288 1348 281 211 285 1353 278 213 280 1351 280 232 282 1356 279 213 285 1351 276 215 285 1348 277 216 278 1359 278 216 279 1353 272 214 283 1358 276 216 276 1351 278 214 284 1357 275 217 276 1353 270 217 277 1353 272 220 277 1351 275 220 272 1356 275 1353 273 224 277 236 282 1355 272 1353 273 233 273 222 268 1358 270 219 277 1361 274 218 280 1358 272 1355 271 243 251 11302

The first 2 pulses are the header and the last 2 pulses are the footer. These are meant to identify the pulses as genuine. We don’t use them for further processing. The next step is to transform this output into 36 groups of 4 pulses (and thereby dropping the header and footer pulses).

286 201 289 1337
287 209 283 1351
287 204 289 1339
288 207 288 1341
289 207 281 1343
284 205 292 1346
282 212 283 1348
282 213 279 1352
282 211 281 1349
282 210 283 1347
284 211 288 1348
281 211 285 1353
278 213 280 1351
280 232 282 1356
279 213 285 1351
276 215 285 1348
277 216 278 1359
278 216 279 1353
272 214 283 1358
276 216 276 1351
278 214 284 1357
275 217 276 1353
270 217 277 1353
272 220 277 1351
275 220 272 1356
275 1353 273 224
277 236 282 1355
272 1353 273 233
273 222 268 1358
270 219 277 1361
274 218 280 1358
272 1355 271 243

If we now look at carefully at these groups you can distinguish two types of groups:

  1. 272 1355 271 243
  2. 274 218 280 1358

So the first group is defined by a high 2nd and the second group has a high 4th pulse. So we take either of these two pulses to define a 0 or a 1. In this case we say a high 2nd pulse means a 1 and a low 2nd pulse means a 0. We then get the following output:

00000000000000000000000001010001

Each (group) of numbers has a specific meaning:

  • ID: 0 till 25
  • All: 26
  • State: 27
  • Unit: 28 till 31
00000000000000000000000001 0 1 0001
  • The ID is defined as a binary number
  • The All tells us if a code was meant for all devices with the same ID
  • The State defines whether a devices is opened or closed
  • The Unit is also defined as a binary number

So this code represents:

  • ID: 1
  • All: Single
  • State: Up
  • Unit: 1

Another example:

  • ID: 123456
  • All: All
  • State: Down
  • Unit: 15
00000000011110001001000000101111